Canadian Personal Finance Happy Hour – 8th Edition – BC Day!

I hope all my Canadian friends had a great long weekend. We did our annual trek down to Long Beach Washington (near Oregon border) for some sun and sand. Our girl is too small to play so next year will be even better.

It was great to pick up fresh albacore tuna for $7 / lb (although I saw cheaper prices elsewhere I stuck to my guy from last year).

I love going back to this town even though the drive is brutal (5 hours + ferry). We went to a Farmers market and a woman thought our daughter was cute and even made her an ornament.

On to the posts:

Invest It Wisely @ Invest It Wisely writes Important Steps in the Home Buying Process – Here are the important steps in the home buying process. See if you agree.

Don @ MoneySmartGuides writes Consumers Are Horrible At Math – Derek Thompson over at The Atlantic wrote a great article titled “The 11 Ways That Consumers Are Hopeless at Math”.

Aloysa @ My Broken Coin writes What Would You Take With You in Case of a Fire? – I feel that I became too materialistic, too attached to stuff. If anything dreadful happens to us, I will be devastated by a loss of material things that took years to accumulate. I realize that material possessions are just bits and pieces of our lives and not really us. So if a fire happened, what would you grab first?

Jon the Saver @ Free Money Wisdom writes 13 Part-time Jobs With Benefits – Do you want some good news on the employment front? Here it is: you can getemployee benefits on many part-time jobs.

Ted Jenkin @ Your Smart Money Moves writes Three Ways Credit Card Companies Can Trick You – When the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was put into place, credit card holders were supposed to benefit from the new

Suba @ Broke Professionals writes 6 Things to Do This Summer to Boost Your Promotion Potential – Here are six things to do this summer to boost your promotion potential!

Jester @ The Ultimate Juggle writes The Personal Power of Changing a Blog Theme – Change is important in life, sometimes just a little change like a blog theme can greatly change your attitude!

Passive Income Earner @ The Passive IncomeEarner writes Why Hold High Yield Stocks – High yield investments can play a part in your portfolio. Even though I am a fan of the 10/10 rule of investing which focuses on the growth of a dividend stock,a high yield dividend stock (or income trust) can have a part in a portfolio. In fact, I have high yield investments in my portfolio.

Wayne @ Young Family Finance writes The Cost of Being Sick – Being sicks can put a huge strain on your normal life. It can not only cost you a lot of money, but cause social disruptions.

Eddie @ Finance Fox writes Seven High Paying Part-Time Jobs – A part-time job can also be used to increase retirement savings, supplement business income, and an effective way of dealing with stagnant salaries.

Luke @ Learn Bonds writes Can we Trust Corporate Bond Credit Ratings? – Although there is a lack of trust inthe rating agencies after the financial crisis you can still trust corporate bond credit ratings.

Anne @ Unique Gifter writes 4 Wedding Food Savings Tips (for guests) – Attending a million weddings this summer? Just going on vacation? Here are some ways to save your money on Food, as a guest. This works especially well if you’re in a hotel with a group of people!

MR @ Money Reasons writes Spending Money Fail! How We Spend More Than We Realize – How spending on a car repair cause great financial anguish while the lunches I’d had that week cost even more! It funny what we worry about financially.

Jason @ Work Save Live writes Does Canceling a Credit Card Hurt Your Credit? – Should You Consider Canceling Your Credit Card? Nearly everybody on this planet knows that Dave Ramsey is against credit cards; so much so that he shuns the idea of utilizing cards for their rewards and encourages people to CANCEL all of their cards despite the fact that canceling it may hurt your credit.

Sustainable PF @ Sustainable Personal Finance writes Want to Boost Your Savings? Consider a TFSA – One of the most interesting options that Canadians have when it comes to saving money is the Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA).

SFB @ Simple Finance Blog writes How Does Corporate Finance Work? – Corporate finance is thefinance of companies and businesses, and the tools used to make financial decisions for businesses. The primary goal of corporate finance is to increase the value of the company. Most corporate finance issues can be broken down into either long-term or short-term goals and decisions. For example, capital spending, long-term financing…

Bridget @ Money After Graduation writes Why I travel – Read my philosophy with respect to traveling and why I love it.

John @ Married (with Debt) writes Workplace Stress – The verdict is in – your job is killing you. More specifically, workplace stress is killing you. This meanswe’ve come full circle from our days as cavemen, when our biggest source of stress was finding food.

Daisy @ Add Vodka writes Why Babysitting is an Awesome Side Hustle – I babysit as a side hustle. I watch two kids that live fairly close to where I work. It works out perfectly, because I get off at 4:00 and I start babysitting at 4:30 a couple of days a week.

Sean @ One Smart Dollar writes Credit Unions vs Banks – Which is Best for You? – A lot of people don’t know this difference between banks and credit unions. Here is a guide to help you decide which is best for you.

Paul Vachon @ The Frugal Toad writes How to Get the Most From Your Credit Card Rewards – Whipping out the plastic doesn’t sound like the best way to save money, but if used correctly, credit cardscan play a role in stretching your budget and getting the most from your money.

JP @ My Family Finances writes Overanalyzing the Numbers behind the Family Grocery Bill – If you’ve ever wanted to see someone over analyze the family grocery bill, this post is for you.

Daniel @ Sweating the Big Stuff writes Top Five Stress-Free Vacation Tips – Imagine having a stress free vacation: nothing too expensive, no crowds, and no worrying about how things are going back at work. Here’s how to do it.

Jeremy @ Modest Money writes Saving Money By Taking Your Own Lunches To School or Work – If you work outside of the home, you have to supply your own lunch. Unless the executive dining room is at your disposal for free, you are on your own when hunger strikes at lunchtime. Eating lunch in expensive restaurants every day can be fun, but mostworking individuals have neither the time nor the money to indulge in that habit.

Kyle @ The Penny Hoarder writes Earn Extra Cash As a Personal Paparazzi Photographer – Are you an amateur or professional photographer wanting to put your talent to use while earning some money in the process? Here is what you can do to earn extra money.

Holly  @ Club Thrifty writes Save Money by Avoiding Temptation – Each of us has spending triggers. Sometimes, the key to building wealth is to -simply – avoid them.

Echo @ Boomer & Echo writes The Ins and Outs of No Medical Exam Life Insurance – No medical exam life insurance has higher premiums than a standard life insurance policy, but may actually be less expensive for someone who’s likely to be rated. The tradeoff is in the benefits.

 

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11 thoughts on “Canadian Personal Finance Happy Hour – 8th Edition – BC Day!”

  1. Thanks for the mention Steve. You island folks apparently don’t know what a brutally long drive is. When I go visit my dad in norther BC it is about a 14 hour drive. When I drive to Calgary to visit other relatives it is probably close to the same. I consider the 6 hour drive to my mom’s house to be a breeze. I guess a baby in the car would make your drive seem a lot longer though.

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