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Free land

6 Cities States or Provinces That Will Pay You To Live There

In the face of declining or slowing population growth, some cities have decided to get aggressive about their survival for new tax revenue.

Free land

Some cities are giving away free land, while other states and cities are literally handing out stacks of cash to folks who agree to move.

Here are the 6 cities that really, really want you to move there!

1. Detroit, Michigan

We all know the trouble Detroit has had in recent years with the auto industry.

A program in Detroit is offering college graduates a $2,500 first year allowance and a $1000 second year allowance towards the cost of renting an apartment/condo in the city. They’re also offering up to $20,000 in forgivable loans for new homebuyers who purchase a property in the city.

In order to participate, you’ve got to work for one of the companies that have partnered with the city to offer this program. Some of those companies include Compuware, Quicken Loans, and Strategic Staffing Solutions.

You can find all of the information on the city’s website: http://www.detroitlivedowntown.org/

2. Lincoln, Kansas

The state of Kansas has had a declining population, so towns like Lincoln and Osbourne have taken to giving out free plots of land in order to entice new residents.

Depending on the city, there are different qualifications that you need to meet. You usually need to agree to build a single-family home on the land and live there for a set amount of time (5 years or so).

Check out all the cities that are giving away land at:  http://www.kansasfreeland.com/

3. Alaska

Since 1976, Alaska has paid its residents to live there via its Permanent Fund Reserve. The payouts are funded by Alaska’s oil royalties and are divided up evenly among citizens. Over the years the payouts have varied from the smallest ($331.29 per person in 1984) to the largest ($3,269.00 per person in 2008 when a one-time $1,200 Alaska Resource Rebate was added to the dividend amount), but the average payment is usually around $1,250.

[quote]In order to be eligible for the rebate, you must not claim residency in any other state or country.[/quote]

For more information check out: http://www.pfd.state.ak.us/

4. Saskatchewan

In an effort to attract more college graduates, Saskatchewan is offering both Canadians and immigrants $20,000 Canadian to live and work in the province for 7 years. You’ve got to be a recent graduate though (after 2006).

Saskatchewan is thriving and opportunities for graduates have never been brighter. The Graduate Retention Program rewards you for building your future in Saskatchewan by providing a rebate up to $20,000 of tuition fees paid by eligible graduates who live in Saskatchewan and who file a Saskatchewan income tax return.

The Graduate Retention Program became effective January 1, 2008.

The “Graduate Retention Program” was expanded in 2008 to help entice graduates from all over the world. The $20,000 bonus is paid in chunks each year when you file your taxes.

For more information check out: http://aeei.gov.sk.ca/grp

5. Camden, Maine

If you’re a business owner in need of land, Camden will give you a prime 2.8 acres if you agree to create 24 new jobs in the city.

This 2.8 acre site is located in the heart of one of the most desirable coastal towns in New England – Camden, Maine. The Town of Camden has invested approximately $1 million to reclaim and restore this former industrial site. With views of the Megunticook River and just blocks away from the beautiful Camden harbor, this site is ready to go.

The land is currently valued at $175,000. You have to put up the initial cash for the deal, but the town will refund you your money once you meet all of the requirements.

Get all the details and fill out an application at http://www.freelandinmaine.org/

6. Curtis, Nebraska

How would you like a prime piece of golf course real estate for free?

In Curtis Nebraska, the towns all-grass, nine-hole Arrowhead Meadows Golf Course (apparently one of the best in the state) has 8 plots of land left and if you agree to build a house, they’ll give it you for free. All of the lots utility ready and located on paved streets.

Claim your free land here: http://www.curtis-ne.com/amlots.php

I am not sure I can convince my wife to move but if I was a Canadian graduate I would seriously consider moving to Saskatchewan (been a hot province for jobs recently).

Would you move anywhere if there were financial incentives attached?

Lifelong Learning RRSP

How the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) works

The Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) allows you to withdraw amounts from your RRSPs to finance full-time training or education for you or your spouse or common-law partner. You cannot participate in the LLP to finance your children’s training or education, or the training or education of your spouse’s or common-law partner’s children.

To participate in the LLP, all of the following conditions must apply:

[unordered_list style=”star”]

  • You must own an RRSP.
  • The student must enroll on a full-time basis (or on a part-time basis if the LLP student meets the disability conditions).
  • The RRSP owner has to be a resident of Canada.
  • The student must enroll in a qualifying educational program at a designated educational institution.
  • The participation in the Lifelong Learning Plan has to be done before the end of the year the student reaches the age of 71 years old.

[/unordered_list]

 

Lifelong Learning RRSP

You are responsible for making sure that all Lifelong Learning Plan conditions are met. If a condition is not met while you are participating in the plan, your RRSP withdrawal will not be considered eligible. You will have to include the RRSP withdrawal as income on your income tax return for the year you received the funds.

Repayments to your RRSP under the Lifelong Learning Plan

When you withdraw funds from your RRSP under the Lifelong Learning Plan, you have up to 10 years to make repayments to your RRSPs. Usually, each year you have to repay 1/10 of the total amount you withdrew until the full amount is repaid. You do not have to pay any interest on the amounts you withdrew.

repayment is a contribution to your RRSP that you designate on Schedule 7 of your tax return as a repayment under the Lifelong Learning Plan. You can make the repayment to an existing RRSP or to a new RRSP. The RRSP issuer will give you an official receipt for the contribution. You have to send a return even if you do not owe any tax.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68751915@N05/6757895857/sizes/s/in/photostream/

Totally Money Blog Carnival – #52

Welcome to the Totally Money Blog Carnival. This is the 52nd edition.

This was my first ever crack at running a personal finance blog carnival and I have a greater appreciation for the job of an editor now! It was a lot of work and really interesting reading about new personal finance concepts and new articles.

[box type=”info”]If you want to be featured in upcoming editions, please use this submission form.  They are also still looking for carnival hosts. [/box]

Please enjoy!

The majority of articles submitted this week was the one the 2 things we are assured of in life: death and taxes! So this week’s theme is taxes!

[box type=”info”]What are you doing to minimize the amount you pay for income taxes this year? I am personally maximizing my tax returns by contributing more money to my RRSP (a 401K equivalent to my US readers).[/box]

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68751915@N05/6757895857/sizes/s/in/photostream/

Editor’s Choice:

I now present my editor’s choice picks this week.

Crystal presents 5 Tips on How to Improve Your Credit Score posted at Budgeting in the Fun Stuff. Improving your credit score seems like it should be a fairly easy thing. Pay your bills on time, and you should have a good credit score, right? Well, that is not always the case. While it is always a good idea to pay your bills and to pay them on time, simply paying on time will not always guarantee a great credit score because other factors are involved.

[quote style=”boxed”]Your credit score is important for your mortage rate and borrowing opportunities, Crystal gives some great tips.[/quote]

Erika presents Taking control of our finances posted at Newlyweds on a Budget. How one young couple hopes to take control of their finances, pay off debt and save money in 2012.

[quote style=”boxed”]I love to read tips for young couples – all these tips add up.[/quote]

MR presents Are Famous Personal Finance Authors Too Rich To Understand You? posted at Money Reasons. Do rich personal finance authors forget what it’s like to live in the middle? Do you think personal finance bloggers walk the walk and talk the talk better?

Ben Demeter presents 11 Most Evil Things the Banking Industry Did in 2011 posted at Credit Card Assist Blog. Ben created a summary of the most egregious, harmful and predatory activities of the banking industry as a whole in 2011.

[quote style=”boxed”]As a major stockholder of Canadian bank stocks, it was interesting reading this article and seeing the difference in the United States.[/quote]

Colin Williams presents How To Help Your Children To Save Money posted at humble savers. Helping your children to save is a major step to making sure that they will be financially secure in later life.

[quote style=”boxed”]We are having a little one in a little under two months and we plan to making sure they have a good start in life.[/quote]

Budgeting

Fanny presents How to Create an Airtight Budget in 2 Easy Steps posted at Living Richly on a Budget. If you’ve ever created a budget and then failed to stick with it, you’re in good company. There is a way to get everything in order before you make your budget that will not only make it easier to create, but also help you adhere to it.

Kennedi presents How Do Most People Spend Their Money? posted at Face and Fitness. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, half a household’s money goes to housing and transportation. If we could trim just those two costs … we’d have a ton more to, ahem, “save” (or spend on makeup!)

Careers

Linsey presents Working from Home. . .With a Toddler posted at 1099 Mom. I can imagine that for most Moms, there is at least one “high-needs” kid in the household. Working from home with one in your care, however, takes a delicate balance of being attentive and not allowing yourself to be completely run over.

Bob presents 24 Legit Home-Based Business Opportunities posted at Christian Personal Finance. If you are like many, the thought of starting a home-based business has probably crossed your mind at some point. With the economy being what it is, layoffs all around us, and an increasing desire for many to escape the rat race and work from home many are trying to start a home-based business.

Teacher Man presents Afraid of Life? Grad School Isn’t the Answer posted at My University Money. Many have of course moved on to jobs, others to careers, and still others are pursuing leisure travel or other whims. One option I am seeing taken more and more is to go back to grad school.

Brad presents Upgrade Your Resume By Going Back To School – Just Remember To Bring Along Your Tablet posted at RESUME Mag. With the launch of the newest app for the iPad, iBooks 2, Apple has set out to reinvent the textbook. Here are five ways that this makes it easier to go back to school and upgrade your resume.

Credit

Darwin presents Mortgage Activity Gone Wild Due Record Low Rates – Are You Taking Advantage? posted at Darwin’s Money. Last week, there was a 20 percent surge in mortgage activity driven primarily by refinancing activity from record low rates. The mortgage banker’s association said seasonally adjust refinances were up 26 percent while home purchase loan activity was up 10 percent. Something’s Working! What are you going?

Stephen Vanderpool presents Building a Credit Score from Scratch: 6 Easy Steps posted at NerdWallet.

Building credit is something of a Catch-22. Without a credit card, it’s hard to build a credit history. Without a credit history, it’s hard to qualify for a credit card. So how does someone start from scratch to build a credit score? Honest answer: By starting at the bottom and beginning the long upward climb.

Eddie presents 5 Rules to Teach Your Kids About Credit Cards posted at Finance Fox. Some parents think that credit cards are evil and that keeping kids on the other side is the only way to keep them safe. My parents just never had the time or true knowledge to share anything with me about credit cards.

Shaun presents Get Your Family Out of Debt posted at Smart Family Finance. There are ways to get out of debt if you put your mind to it, and focus on being debt free.

Mike presents Create A Plan To Earn More Rewards Points posted at Rewards Cards USA. One of the biggest complaints that many people have regarding their credit card rewards is that it takes too long to earn the requisite number of points to redeem for anything worthwhile.

Mike presents Scotia Rewards Program Review posted at Rewards Cards Canada. The Scotia Rewards program is a points-based system where members are awarded one Scotia Rewards point for every $1 in purchases charged to your ScotiaGold Passport Visa account or ScotiaGold Passport for business Visa account.

Economy

Sustainable PF presents The Real Reason Nobody Is Buying Electric Cars posted at Sustainable Personal Finance. Thus far, the Volt has been a giant flop. There are all sorts of reasons why, all of which are different symptoms of the same root problem. Let’s see if you can figure it out.

Frugality

Miss T. presents How to Build a Bird Feeder out of Recycled Materials posted at Prairie Eco Thrifter. Here are four quick, simple ways to build a bird feeder from recycled materials that you probably have laying around.

Glen presents How to Save on Groceries When You Have a Food Intolerance posted at Parenting Family Money . When you discover you have a food intolerance, your diet has to change. But you’ll find that groceries get expensive. Save with these tips.

SB presents 8 Tricks to Get Cheap Flight Tickets posted at One Cent at a Time. Over the years, I learned to be more observant, practical, and strategic with my flight ticket purchases. They became some of my techniques in looking for cheap flights. If you want to get them at a bargain, take note of these tips.

Peter presents Is Multi-Generational Living for You? posted at Bible Money Matters. Multi-generational living can be a positive experience for many families, but think carefully about all of the consequences before agreeing; make sure your parents have also considered all of the repercussions. If both parties are agreeable to compromise, the situation may work very well for you.

D.J. presents Seek Alternatives to Save on Your Monthly Phone Bill posted at The Family Wallet. If you are looking to pay off debt or just to trim your household budget, one good place to look to make further cuts is your home telephone service. With so many options currently available, you may find that you don’t even need your home phone service or the expense.

Lisa presents My New Sofa, and Why It’s Covered in Tin Foil posted at Thriftability. From wardrobe updates to home furnishings, thrift stores have made a huge impact on my life, and effected the way I save money. Shopping at thrift stores not only helps me stick to a budget: it also helps recycle pre-owned items which may have ended up in the landfill previously.

Wayne presents Cheap Movie Alternatives posted at Young Family Finance. It isn’t uncommon for young families to be strapped for cash. When you are looking for creative ways to save money without making a huge sacrifice, it is time to get creative. With the popularity of motion picture, it is hard to give up movies. Yet, going to the movies is not getting cheaper.

Money Management

Pam Whitlock presents How much control should kids have over their money? posted at The MoneyTrail Blog. Letting your child make spending decisions can make some parents uneasy. However, kids need to become actively engaged with their money so that money management becomes a relevant part of their life.

Marie presents Ways Your Teenagers Can Increase Their Spending posted at Money Spending Mommy. If your teen is short on cash, here are some ideas that he could use to earn the money he needs.

Barbara Friedberg presents Biggest Money Story of 2011 or How to Get a Decent Return on Your Cash posted at Barbara Friedberg Personal Finance. Money Magazine selected their Top Money Stories of 2011. Initially, I began to dissect their list and intended to write about them all. But, I got stuck on the low interest rates for savings. This is a huge topic and decided it warranted an entire article.

Lazy Man presents Reviewing My 2011 Goals posted at Lazy Man and Money. With 2011 now a distant memory, it’s time to go back and look at my goals for 2011. That’s one major benefit of blogging, there’s accountability baked into everything I do. In 2011, I had set 5 goals, most of them business-related.

Squirrelers presents Stock Market Returns and the Super Bowl Effect posted at Squirrelers. Correlation might not mean causation when it comes to assessing data. That said, there’s an interesting trend involving stock market returns and the Super Bowl. Taking this into account, who do you want to win?

Real Estate

Don presents Live A Life of Wealth posted at MoneySmartGuides. If I were to ask you to describe what being wealthy means to you, how would you answer? A young me late teenager would have answered that question as follows: Wealthy to me is a huge house with an outdoor pool, but now I see wealth differently.

Kyle presents How People Buy Real Estate with “No Money Down” posted at The Penny Hoarder. Some of my favorite infomercials include the ridiculous ‘No Money Down’ real estate videos. If you haven’t already wasted your $360, allow me to spill the beans.

Spending

Boomer presents How Much Do We Spend On Our Pets? posted at Boomer & Echo. The average dog owner claims to spend over $1800 annually on each dog while the average cat owner spends around $1400 on each cat.

Taxes

Sandy presents Applying All the Right Deductions to Increase That Return posted at Yes, I Am Cheap.

Michael presents Turbo Tax 2012 Review posted at PT Money Personal Finance. A review of the differing versions of Turbo Tax 2012, including their customer support.

Jill presents How Do Tax Brackets Work? posted at My Dollar Plan. Are you getting ready to file your taxes? If so, you might find yourself needing a slight refresher on how tax brackets work.

Daniel presents Should Tax Evaders Be Given A Safe Haven? posted at Sweating the Big Stuff. The IRS has given tax evaders who have hidden money in offshore accounts a chance to avoid jail time, netting the IRS at least $4.4 billion.

Everything Finance presents College Credits and Deductions Available When Filing Your Taxes posted at Everything Finance. While there is no doubt that the price of education is outpacing inflation, the government does allow small ways to lower your overall cost.

Other

Kevin presents My Budget Spreadsheet is Too Much Work posted at Thousandaire. My budget spreadsheet is too complicated. I’m making things easier on myself and switching to Mint.com

Corey presents Confessions of a Street Canvasser posted at 20s Finances. Have you ever been walking down the street in New York City, Boston, DC, Chicago, or San Francisco and been stopped by a young person carrying a clipboard and wearing a charity t-shirt? This strange phenomenon has a name ‘ street canvassing.

Amanda L Grossman presents How to Save Money on Dieting posted at Frugal Confessions. Comparing diet program costs is one way to maximize the amount of money you have to spend on dieting or to make you run the other way with your hard earned money, see how they stack up against one another!

Kevin presents 3 Frugal Ideas for a Romantic Valentine’s Day posted at Invest It Wisely. Remember, there’s no need to spend a fortune on Valentine’s Day. Sometimes, a bit of cheap fun is all you need.

Matt presents Should You Get a Loan for Your Car or Pay Cash? posted at RamblingFever Money. In this hypothetical example, two sisters pay the exact same amount monthly for their cars over a five year period. One sister ends up with a 1-year old car worth $20,000 and the other sister ends up with a 5-year old car worth $11,000. How is this possible?

Jen presents Everybody Can Have an Emergency Fund! posted at Master the Art of Saving. If you don’t have an emergency fund at all, then why not start with a goal of $100? Sure it’s not going to be too helpful should a big financial emergency.

Jeffrey presents Making Space For Roommates: Are the Savings Worth the Hassles? posted at Money Spruce.

Hank presents How I Recently Invested In A Rock Band posted at Money Q&A.
There are tons of other great projects on Kickstarter that you can invest in like the new Crowfield album. Kickstarter is a great way to invest in a rock band and other awesome projects.

retirement

Do you know what the difference is between TFSA and RRSP?

According to the BMO Financial group,

[quote]40% of Canadians still don’t know the difference between a TFSA and RRSP.[/quote]

This sounds like a high figure but in speaking to some of my peers, personal finance is not a topic most people enjoy to talk about.

The sample size was 1500 Canadians so it was not a large sample size based on the population.

I wanted to create a small table that compares the 2 popular Canadian savings vehicles.

[tabs style=”boxed” title=”Differences between TFSA and RRSP”]

[tab title=”TFSA”]

  • Canadian residents age 18 or older can contribute up to $5,000 annually to a TFSA.
  • Investment income earned in a TFSA is tax-free.
  • Withdrawals from a TFSA are tax-free.
  • Unused TFSA contribution room is carried forward and accumulates in future years.
  • Full amount of withdrawals can be put back into the TFSA in future years. Re-contributing in the same year may result in an over-contribution amount which would be subject to a penalty tax.
  • Choose from a wide range of investment options such as mutual funds, Guaranteed Investment Certificates (GICs) and bonds.
  • Contributions are not tax-deductible.
  • The TFSA is useful for low-income seniors because these tax-free withdrawals won’t trigger clawbacks of Old Age Security (OAS) or the Guaranteed Income Supplement.

[/tab]

[tab title=”RRSP”]

  • If you are under the age of 69 and have earned income in the previous year, then you are eligible for an RRSP.
  • Earned income accumulates tax-free.
  • Earned income includes income from employment, and can also include supplementary unemployment benefits, alimony and maintenance payments, royalties, research grants, net business income, net rental income, and a few other miscellaneous types of income.
  • Your maximum contribution limit is 18% of your previous year’s earned income up to the maximum level for that year.
  • The eligible investments for an RRSP include: guaranteed investment certificates (GICs), shares of Canadian companies listed on a recognized Canadian stock exchange, bonds, treasury bills, strip coupons, mortgage backed securities, covered call options, warrants and rights issued by companies listed on a Canadian stock exchange, mutual funds, and eligible foreign investments.
  • When money is withdrawn from the plan, after retirement, it will then be subject to income tax, that should be a lower rate.

[/tab]

[/tabs]

Both have there positives and I believe each has a purpose. I personally believe your TFSA should be used for part emergency savings and a long-term savings plan. Also, if you have a pension plan from your employer, you may not need a heavy RRSP account.

Anything I missed about the differences between TFSA and RRSP?

ingdirect

4 reasons to use ING Direct for your TFSA account

One of the main reasons why I think people should put their emergency fund in a TFSA is that they are getting a decent return that keeps up with inflation.

I have nothing but good words to say about ING Direct and came up with 4 reasons to use them.

Reason #1:No fees, no service charges and no minimum balances

This is a great reason. My wife and I use PC Financial, another great company in Canada, that has free chequing accounts for Canadians. We love not having monthly fees or maintenance fees or account setup fees or transfer fees. No Fees banking and investing are the way to go!

Reason #2: Free Bonus when creating an account

Isn’t a bonus great? ING Direct gives you a $25 bonus for each new member that you refer. It is a great perk but not the #1 reason I like ING Direct.

Also, when you open an Account with a minimum balance of $100, ING Direct will start you off with a $25 bonus if you use an Orange Key provided by Grocery Alerts!

Complete the online Enrollment Form. Don’t forget to include the Orange Key 33994459s1 into the enrollment form.

Reason #3: Tell A friend Bonus

Once you have an account, you also get an Orange Key to refer friends and family and not only do they get $25 added to their account, you will also get $25. Not a tell a friend program.

Reason #4: Great rates (not the best though)

Currently, ING Direct Canada is paying for their Tax-Free Investment Savings Account (TFSA)  a rate of 2.00%. This is a good rate but it is in no means going to make you rich! I use our families TFSA account for storing our emergency fund and for saving for certain holidays. Canadian Tire actually had a larger rate last week (3.5%) but I like ING Direct and they are easy to use.

AndrewHallam

Do you know who Andrew Hallam is? The Millionaire Teacher

I first heard about Andrew Hallom from The Wealthy Canadian (awesome Canadian PF blog).

He is set to publish a new personal finance book, called Millionaire Teacher in September 21, 2011. At the moment he is teaching high school English at Singapore American School. He will be taking the next school year off to promote his book and spread financial awareness.

Most people wouldn’t expect a school teacher to amass a million-dollar investment account. But Andrew Hallam did it, long before the typical retirement age.  And he wants to show you how. With lively humor and the simple clarity you’d expect from a gifted educator, he demonstrates in Millionaire Teacher how average people can build wealth in the stock market by shunning the investment products peddled by most financial advisors and avoiding the get-rich-quicker products concocted by an ever widening, self-serving industry.

Using low cost index funds, coupled with a philosophy in line with Warren Buffett’s, he guides readers to understand how the stock and bond markets really work, arming readers with a psychological advantage when markets fall. Readers will learn that young investors should hope for stock market crashes if they want to grow rich. Millionaire Teacher shows how you can spend just 60 minutes a year on your investments, never open a financial paper, and avoid investment news, while leaving most professional investors in the dust.

The number 1 lesson he teaches is:

[highlight]If you want to get rich, you have to live below your means.[/highlight]

It sounds like an interesting premise, his blog is located at http://andrewhallam.com/

ETF_title

Where to find Commission-Free ETFs in Canada?

[quote]Scotia iTRADE has partnered with Claymore1 to bring you commission-free* online trading on 46 ETFs, covering a vast array of sectors, from Claymore ETFs®* and other leading Canadian ETF providers.[/quote]

Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are among the fastest growing investment products in today’s global marketplace. Built like mutual funds, ETFs consist of a portfolio of investment products, but they trade like individual stocks on major stock exchanges and can be bought or sold at any time in any amount throughout the trading day.

What does this mean?

Usually when buying and selling ETFs you incur commissions. You can pay as much as $29 per trade depending on your broker. There is no minimum order amount.

Hopefully some other discount brokerages like Questrade will follow suit with this!

Here is the list of ETFs that are available.

Symbol Market Description Sector
CLF CDN CLAYMORE 1-5 YR LADDERED GOV’T BOND Bond
CBO CDN CLAYMORE 1-5YR LADDERED CORP BOND Bond
CAB CDN CLAYMORE ADVANTAGED CDN BOND INDEX Bond
CHB CDN CLAYMORE ADVANTAGED HIGH YIELD BOND Bond
CRQ CDN CLAYMORE CANADIAN FUNDAMENTAL INDEX CDN Index
HXT CDN HORIZONS S&P/TSX 60 IDX CDN Index
XMD CDN ISHARES S&P/TSX COMPLETION CDN Index
COW CDN CLAYMORE GLOBAL AGRICULTURE Commodities
CBR CDN CLAYMORE BROAD COMMODITY Commodities
CGL CDN CLAYMORE GOLD BULLION Commodities
CGL.C CDN CLAYMORE GOLD BULLION (C$ HEDGED) Commodities
HUK CDN HORIZONS BETAPRO COMEX COPPER Commodities
HUZ CDN HORIZONS BETAPRO COMEX SILVER Commodities
XST CDN ISHARES S&P/TSX CAPPED CONSUMER STAPLE Consumer Staples
DLR CDN HORIZONS US DOLLAR CURRENCY Currency
GAS CDN CLAYMORE NATURAL GAS Energy
HUC CDN HORIZONS BETAPRO NYMEX CRUDE OIL Energy
HJE CDN HORIZONS GMP JR OIL & GAS IDX Energy
CLO CDN CLAYMORE OIL SANDS SECTOR Energy
XEN CDN ISHARES JANTZI SOCIAL INDEX Ethical
CEW CDN CLAYMORE EQUAL WEIGHT BANC & LIFECO Financial Services
XHC CDN ISHARES S&P/TSX GLOBAL HEALTHCARE Healthcare
CSD CDN CLAYMORE SHORT DURATION HIGH INCOME Income
CBD CDN CLAYMORE BALANCED INCOME Income
CPD CDN CLAYMORE S&P/TSX CDN PREFERRED SHARE Income CDN Div
CDZ CDN CLAYMORE S&P/TSX CDN DIVIDEND Income CDN Div
FIE CDN CLAYMORE CANADIAN FINANCIAL MONTHLY INCOME Income CDN Div
CYH CDN CLAYMORE GLOBAL MONTHLY ADVANTAGED DIVIDEND Income- International Div
XIT CDN ISHARES S&P/TSX CAPPED INFO TECHNOLOGY Information Technology
CIF CDN CLAYMORE GLOBAL INFRASTRUCTURE Infrastructure
CHI CDN CLAYMORE CHINA International – Equities
CBN CDN CLAYMORE BALANCED GROWTH International- Equities
CIE CDN CLAYMORE INTERNATIONAL FUNDAMENTAL INDEX International- Index
CJP CDN CLAYMORE JAPAN FUNDAMENTAL INDEX (C$ HEDGED) International- Index
CWO CDN CLAYMORE BROAD EMERGING MARKETS International- Index
CBQ CDN CLAYMORE BRIC ETF International- Index
XID CDN ISHARES S&P CNX NIFTY INDIA INDEX International- Index
XLA CDN ISHARES S&P LATIN AMERICA 40 INDEX International- Index
CMW CDN CLAYMORE S&P/TSX GLOBAL MINING Materials
CMR CDN CLAYMORE PREMIUM MONEY MARKET Money Market
CGR CDN CLAYMORE GLOBAL REAL ESTATE Real Estate
CLU CDN CLAYMORE US FUNDAMENTAL (C$ HEDGED) US Index
CLU.C CDN CLAYMORE US FUNDAMENTAL US Index
HXS CDN HORIZONS S&P 500 IDX (C$ HEDGED) US Index
CWW CDN CLAYMORE S&P GLOBAL WATER Utilities
XUT CDN ISHARES S&P/TSX CAPPED UTILITIES Utilities
Legend CLAYMORE FUNDS1 HORIZON FUNDS ISHARES FUNDS

 

cleaning-lady

How To Earn Extra Money with a Residential House Cleaning Service

Most families would love extra money in their pocket.

Here is a business anyone can start that with very little money up-front. With a bucket of cleaning supplies and some rags you have an instant business.

You do not need much more than a vacuum, dust pan and broom. You can even rent equipment like a carpet or blind cleaner to save money.

How much can I make cleaning houses?

I would recommend charging between $20-$25 per hour at the minimum. It depends on where you live but I find this rate guarantees you some customers. You can always raise your prices if you find you are too busy.

How to advertise?

With the Internet, it is easy to start to a business and start marketing. Create a small Facebook ad that targets your geographical area to your clientele (busy people that don’t want to or have time to clean).

Use flyers to advertise on some community bulletin boards.

Create a low-cost website that shows your services and what you offer.

 

StruggleoverMoney

Why you should include your spouse in making the budget?

Budgeting with your spouse can be stressful. It is a challenge to balancing the needs of your spouse with your own.

Several reasons why you should do this:

1. You figure out what is important to the other person.

If one of you wants to save for a house and the other is saving for a car, you have different priorities and when you make a budget.

Do you want to save up for a house? Do you want to go on vacation? 

2.You both can see what the bottom line is. 

In some relationships, the other spouse may plead ignorance or not know where the money goes. Working together on the budget, each person looks at the combined income, expenses, credit card balance, debt, etc.

This is useful and important for trust in the relationship.

I am pleased working with my wife on developing our budget because circumstances change.

My tip is to make sure to give the other person a few compromises.

Anyone else have ideas on why this is important?

Is Netflix (NFLX) stock headed for the bottom?

One of the main reasons I don’t like to invest in technology companies or technology services anymore is that the next ‘big thing’ can come along and convince the consumer to switch brands.

An example is Netflix (NFLX).

Their Unique Selling Proposition is that they are an easy way to view a huge library of videos and you can watch on a variety of devices and you do not need to buy cable anymore at an affordable price.

What I see happening is that the telcos and cable companies are creating a better experience for video-on-demand and people are starting to see that the Netflix catalog consists of a variety of B-movies and lack in current new releases.

Companies like Google with YouTube, and Hulu, and the existing cable companies are planning to take back this market that Netflix captured the last few years.

Here is their current stock price over the last year:

If you notice how the stock had a resistance point at over the $300/share point and is slowly moving down.

How do you see this company moving forward?

Disclosure:

I currently do not own any Netflix stock.